147 Blog

  • abby
    A Helpful Heart A Helpful Heart

    A Helpful Heart

A Helpful Heart

Today was our first full day at the orphanage. I’m not really sure what I was expecting, but the experience exceeded all of my expectations. We played with the kids and did various chores around the buildings. . One moment that stuck out to me happened when my friend Gabby and I were washing dishes after lunch. We had just begun to scrub the massive pile of plates when we noticed we had a shadow. This little boy had snuck over and was just watching us clean the dishes. Soon enough he was the irreplaceable third part of our dish washing dream team by putting the washed dishes out in the sun to dry. This moment struck me because it showed me that even though we are here to serve them, their hearts were more than willing to serve us as well. He may not have been able to reciprocate any material gifts but he gave us all that he had: his helpful heart. Abby Broussard

  • Kayla02
    Love Needs No Translation Love Needs No Translation

    Love Needs No Translation

Love Needs No Translation

Work gloves:  check Sunscreen:  check 147 Shirt:  check You spend days packing (or a day in my case), but that does nothing to prepare your heart for what you’ll experience.  On one hand, you heart breaks when you listen to the story of Miriam, who was in college studying English when she had her first child, and now lives in one of the houses 147 Million built.  But then it is stitched back together with each right hug and genuine smile you receive from the children of Mt. Olivos and Copprome. After all, love needs no translation. I got a shirt just before the trip that said, “love needs no translation,” and this past week has made me realize the true depth of that phrase far beyond what I thought it meant.  I was a bit nervous coming on this trip, to be honest.  I’m deaf, and while I use sign language about 75% of the time, that other 25% is spent trying to figure what everyone is saying…in English!  So, I thought, throw Spanish into the mix, and I would spend the week wandering around, trying to follow the conversation.  All those fears went flying out the window when a littler stranger names Said, of about 2 ½ feet, held up his arms, begging for me to pick him up. Love needs no translation. I was constantly reminded of this fact with every smile shared with the people shoveling dirt, every laugh among team members at dinner, and every selfless gesture between team members and the people of Mt. Olivos.  Before arriving, I expected the days to be long and full of manual labor, I had prepared myself for that.  Instead, our days were […]

  • carlita
    Some Kind of Extraordinary Some Kind of Extraordinary

    Some Kind of Extraordinary

Some Kind of Extraordinary

Mark 10:21 Jesus looked at him and loved him. “One thing you lack,” he said. “Go, sell everything you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.” After reading through this piece of scripture this morning, my written prayer was simple; I asked: Lord Jesus may I follow you in the little ways today. Might I continually—hour by hour—choose to put off my old self and let go of what I have on this earth, in order that I might have more of you. Might my posture within my work for you today be like that of the ultimate servant, your Son Jesus. Following Jesus looks the same whether I’m at home with my family, at college with friends, working with clients on a job, babysitting kids, or here in El Progreso, Honduras. Following Jesus means saying no to me and yes to Him whether I’m tired, hungry, joyful, bored, angry, confused, or whatever other emotion I am engaged in at that moment, and whatever my circumstance is. One of my favorite authors, Bob Goff, writes: “Following Jesus is about having your paradigms shift as you navigate a wide range of emotions while living the big life Jesus invites us into. Because I know Jesus, where I once thought of things in one way, now I think of them in another way. It happens all the time, every day.” I have traveled to this country of Honduras to work here with the people several times now, and it could be said that, yes, there is a certain model, or paradigm if you will, to how we run these trips. The construction we do is similar each time, the […]

  • Titus
    Can we come back? Can we come back?

    Can we come back?

Can we come back?

From Day 1, Titus, my 11 year old son asked; “Dad, can we come back next year?”. Our team had barely arrived on Honduran soil and he was asking to come back. It may have been the children at Copprome, or the adventure of being in another country, but early on his heart was bent on coming back. Several months before that moment my wife and I decided that Titus and I would go on a mission trip, of some sort, over the summer. We knew that he was at a critical point in life, as he is entering Jr. High, and that we needed to encourage his faith as much as possible. At first, he was apprehensive, then he dove into the adventure, and now he was asking to come back. Throughout our week, I saw Titus serve alongside men and young adults bigger and stronger than him. I saw him mix concrete, carry buckets, kick a ball and give piggyback rides to children whom he would consider friends. I saw him overcome language barriers, sickness, and a strange culture all because he wanted to serve and to love one more. The spiritual implications of our 5 days at Mt. Olivos could not have been more significant. We dug a foundation for a school that will impact generations to come. We watched a team member run electricity for the shop and saw lights come on in the village for the very first time. We saw people of two very different nations and backgrounds serve alongside each other as the body of Christ. Day after day the importance of this week was etched into my heart and soul and I hoped that Titus was seeing […]

  • 715-1
    Light of the World Light of the World

    Light of the World

Light of the World

In coming home from Honduras, I have been able to reflect on all that I saw, heard, and felt.  There are times when I feel anger rise.  I am angry because of the conditions on which people live, angry at the circumstances children are born in to, and angry that I am guilty of living my life with a “first world” problems view.  Aren’t we all guilty of that at times?  Our food is too cold?  Someone jumped in front of me in line?  My flight is delayed?!@?  I don’t think I have been ever been angry because a cow is standing in the creek that I wash my clothes in, or there is no medication available to heal a simple ailment, or because I have no idea how I am going to feed my children.  In a place where there is so much darkness, where is the light? In the midst of many hard things to see, I saw hope!  In the village of Mt.  Olivos, there is hope.  Houses have been built.  Through a well system, there is clean water.  There is food.  A school is being built.  People are being taught skills to sustain income.  Families are being empowered.  Children are remaining in families instead of having to be placed in orphanages. But with all these great things, the people still had no electricity.  While we were there, I experienced one of the most humbling things I have ever witnessed.  147 provided a generator to the village to provide power.  I was in the school, when I heard the loud rumbling of a generator, followed by claps and cheers.  I went out to see what was going on.  Do you know what […]

  • morgan
    Raw Love Raw Love

    Raw Love

Raw Love

I am a firm believer in God appointments. I believe God places you in a specific place at a specific time for a specific reason. Day number one in Mt. Olivos, and we hit the ground running. Concrete mixing, building, and lots of loving. The vans pulled down the dirt and gravel road and sweet smiling faces came running. This is my first trip to the village, but the way previous teams have poured into these people, you would have thought I had been there 40 times. The amount of trust and hope the people of Mt. Olivos place in 147 and the people that come to serve is inspiring and authentic. One thing I know is the love and joy found here is raw and real. There are no expectations, no material distractions, nothing standing in the way of love. The kind of love Jesus demonstrates to us daily. Jesus loves us through our dirt, our mess, and our hang ups, and I find peace in that. Jesus shines through children to me.. I look into the faces of the precious kids and remember that they are made in the image of Jesus just as I am. Today I am thankful for the people of Mt. Olivos for exemplifying Jesus and showing me a real, authentic love. I am thankful for the commonality of both being made in the image of Jesus. Today was full of God appointments. One specifically that is impressed on my brain is a lady that came in from another village with burns all down the side of her arm and back. She came to Mt. Olivos seeking our help because she heard there were people doing good things. The […]

  • kimberly
    Inside the Madrina House Inside the Madrina House

    Inside the Madrina House

Inside the Madrina House

The busy season is just around the corner and the girls are getting excited for everyone to come. Unfortunately not everyone will have the joy of being able to come and visit us this summer and get a chance to meet the girls and see our house. For those of you who wont be able to make it down, I want to let you in on a bit of what is going on in our household! Coming home is always an interesting adventure. The moment I slide the gate shut behind me, I always begin to wonder what I will find when I walk into our house. The other night I walked into the house and there were a bunch of people in the house. There were people in the kitchen cooking, people in the living room laughing and listening to music, young children were playing with puzzles and a little baby was crawling around. It was like walking into a well air conditioned store on a hot summer day, it was super refreshing! Some of the girls friends were over and their family had come with. Homemade baleadas were being made in the kitchen (a traditional Honduran meal) and it smelled delicious. The girls love inviting people over more than anything else. The more in our house, the happier they are! They love being able to have somewhere to invite people, to cook together, to laugh together, to simply be together! Quickly I joined in and helped with the food process, and made the sacrifice of entertaining the baby! (Okay! Okay!! I looooved every moment of it!) The other day when I came home I walked into a very quiet house, with a missing […]

  • Jacob
    Changed by Jesus Changed by Jesus

    Changed by Jesus

Changed by Jesus

I’m finding myself humbled more and more by the treasure that my brothers and sisters in Honduras are being changed by Jesus… and not by me. I’ve seen how mission trips ignite a spiritual flame, tear-up our hearts, evoke emotions, break us down and inspire us. I noticed this pattern in my own life from past mission trips, and had prayed that this trip would open my eyes beyond that boundary. This time I found deeper significance in simply passing concrete buckets, being vulnerable with my deficient Honduran spanish, bending rebar, sharing a smile and throwing a child in the air. It’s a gift for me to see how the Lord uses everyday activities as a vehicle for His people to love. It was interesting to ponder the differences of how we love in America, not that we’re wrong, but that we could learn. I had a blast working alongside the villagers in construction, and specifically Julio. Julio has taken on the role of being one of the men heading up the construction of the twenty-four houses in the village Mt. Olivos. I admire his work ethic, his passion and his heart for the people and Jesus. During the first few hours that I worked with him we communicated only through body language, swapping tools, eye contact, confused raised eyebrows and smiles. We eventually began speaking to each other in Spanish and made small conversation. I found it pretty wild to see how Julio and I are from two different countries, different lifestyles, different languages, different conditions, different ages and our our common denominator being that we both served the same sovereign God. I can’t recall who it was in the village that said “all […]

  • line
    We are God’s Workmanship We are God’s Workmanship

    We are God’s Workmanship

We are God’s Workmanship

“For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.”  Ephesians 2:10 I love this verse…for the message is simple.  I love that Christians who truly believe this leave the comforts of home, miss soccer games and gym meets, and are not home for their wife’s birthday because they know that good works are an out-growth of faith in a Father who prepared in advance for us to do HIS work.  Healing the sick, loving on the orphans, feeding the poor. This week has been incredible although I didn’t witness any miracles.  The little boy at the beach with the deformed legs, I would have loved to have seen his precious little legs just miraculously straighten out.  The orphans at Copprome still don’t have a family and a mommy or daddy to tuck them in at night and say prayers with them.  The people in the villages are going to live without proper treatment of their diabetes and high blood pressure and UTI’s.  Most will live their entire lives with very little dental care and will live months and years with abessed  teeth until someone comes.  Someone who comes willing to do HIS work. Father, thank you for your words of direction that lead us and guide us to do your work.  Regardless of the conditions, the circumstances, or the outcome.  I pray that today all of the people who were treated this week have some relief from their physical ailments.  And even though I did not see them I pray that miracles happened.  Most importantly I pray that hearts and lives were changed as the Honduran people felt your love and your […]

  • DSC_0037
    Little Ali Little Ali

    Little Ali

Little Ali

Meet Ali.  He was a young boy that we met on the beach at the medical clinic in Tela.  As we began working, I noticed this little boy hanging around.  After a closer look, you noticed something a little different about him.  He appeared to have some type of physical deformity causing his knees, ankles and elbows to be twisted and malformed.  He was literally walking on the side of his foot.  As a physical therapist, I immediately started thinking of braces, therapy, surgeries, etc that would improve his quality of life.  But then you see him smile, play, dance (better than I ever could) and belly flop in the ocean. He was so full of life and joy!  What a strong, brave little boy who did not let any physical disability stop him.  I think that there is a lot to learn from Ali.  Maybe our problem is insecurity, a weight issue, a physical illness or whatever it is.  Like Ali, we can choose joy instead! Mindy Hoying